N64 Stick Converter PCB v3 / firmware v3.5 - PCBs available again (August 2017)

Started by micro, March 13, 2015, 08:57:38 AM

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eard

Just following up here that I put an email order in yesterday for 4 v3s to the US, assuming from the current OP edit that they are still available.

Steve069

Quote from: micro on April 14, 2016, 05:47:42 PM
Quote from: Steve069 on April 12, 2016, 02:25:35 PM
Quote from: micro on March 18, 2016, 05:58:33 AM
The PCB's are back in stock! :)

It seems this might be the last batch... To make it last a little bit longer than the previous one, there will be limit on how many PCB's you can order (= 4).

Got mine this week, went ahead and installed one of them but after it was all said and done my L & R top triggers were stuck into the on position.
Any ideas on what I could have done wrong? I wired them up per your instruction PDF for the optional Range mode and re-calibrate mode.
I knew they were stuck into the on position because the start button would only work at the beginning of Mario kart and would not pause/jump, and in Goldeneye the weapon zoom was stuck on from the beginning.

I de-soldered the extra wires and the controller works great with the new stick, but removing the optional features obviously.
If the L and R buttons are stuck on the "on"position then that means they're shorted to ground. Can you post some good pics showing your wires and solder work?

I already de-soldered the extra wires. I broke down and ordered a "helping hand" tool like you have that should be here next week, soldering these things can be frustrating because they are so small. I will take some good pictures when I install the second one in my other controller and post them here if I have an issue.

Steve069

April 17, 2016, 04:52:40 PM #202 Last Edit: April 17, 2016, 06:51:35 PM by Steve069
Quote from: micro on April 14, 2016, 05:47:42 PM
Quote from: Steve069 on April 12, 2016, 02:25:35 PM
Quote from: micro on March 18, 2016, 05:58:33 AM
The PCB's are back in stock! :)

It seems this might be the last batch... To make it last a little bit longer than the previous one, there will be limit on how many PCB's you can order (= 4).

Got mine this week, went ahead and installed one of them but after it was all said and done my L & R top triggers were stuck into the on position.
Any ideas on what I could have done wrong? I wired them up per your instruction PDF for the optional Range mode and re-calibrate mode.
I knew they were stuck into the on position because the start button would only work at the beginning of Mario kart and would not pause/jump, and in Goldeneye the weapon zoom was stuck on from the beginning.

I de-soldered the extra wires and the controller works great with the new stick, but removing the optional features obviously.
If the L and R buttons are stuck on the "on"position then that means they're shorted to ground. Can you post some good pics showing your wires and solder work?

Micro, I went ahead and started installing the second PCB into my second controller.
I've been taking a whole bunch of pictures during the process to show you my install in case I ran into a problem.

I stopped when I realized the PCB is mis-labeled on one side...the L & the Z are different on each side, does this matter at all? (One side says this hole is Z, etc. and you flip it over and it says this hole is L). The R appears to be the same on each side tho.

Here are some pics.


As you can see here, the L solder point is on the edge of the PCB and the Z is on the inside.

With this pic you can see when its flipped over, the Z is on the outside edge of the PCB and the L is on the inside.

I noticed this was the same with some of the pictures of the previous PCB but maybe no one else caught it (or it doesn't matter, I am not an electrical engineer so IDK).

Junior

 OOOOOOOOOO I lost the batch!!??! nooooo!! still available ????
Rio de Janeiro - Brasil !!!

Vectrexpert64

Just saying, great job on this project.
I am very interested in ordering, so, what's the current availability?
I have three of the GC-styled sticks and they are far too sensitive.
Thanks in advance

Junior

 Hey, someone already tested how Super Smash Bros work with this pcb ?? because the gc style is horrible to SSB and i will train advanced techniques. Someone know about high level play style in SSB with this pcb??
Rio de Janeiro - Brasil !!!

dav3yb

Quote from: Junior on April 22, 2016, 01:32:14 PM
Hey, someone already tested how Super Smash Bros work with this pcb ?? because the gc style is horrible to SSB and i will train advanced techniques. Someone know about high level play style in SSB with this pcb??

It works a LOT better.  the original GC sticks were hyper sensitive, and doing tilt attacks were pretty difficult without accidentally dashing/jumping when wanting to do those things.  There is still a bit of a learning curve to using them, as its different from both the hori minipad and the original sticks, but i could easily see someone getting used to it and being able to do well with them in a more serious setting.

Steve069

Quote from: micro on April 14, 2016, 05:47:42 PM
Quote from: Steve069 on April 12, 2016, 02:25:35 PM
Quote from: micro on March 18, 2016, 05:58:33 AM
The PCB's are back in stock! :)

It seems this might be the last batch... To make it last a little bit longer than the previous one, there will be limit on how many PCB's you can order (= 4).

Got mine this week, went ahead and installed one of them but after it was all said and done my L & R top triggers were stuck into the on position.
Any ideas on what I could have done wrong? I wired them up per your instruction PDF for the optional Range mode and re-calibrate mode.
I knew they were stuck into the on position because the start button would only work at the beginning of Mario kart and would not pause/jump, and in Goldeneye the weapon zoom was stuck on from the beginning.

I de-soldered the extra wires and the controller works great with the new stick, but removing the optional features obviously.
If the L and R buttons are stuck on the "on"position then that means they're shorted to ground. Can you post some good pics showing your wires and solder work?

Do you have a response to my question about the L&Z pads being labeled differently on each side? I want to finish these controllers up soon and get the extra features working.

micro

Quote from: Vectrexpert64 on April 21, 2016, 08:11:01 PM
Just saying, great job on this project.
I am very interested in ordering, so, what's the current availability?
I have three of the GC-styled sticks and they are far too sensitive.
Thanks in advance
I've got still some left, but only a hand full. If you want some, just send me an email (see 1st post).



Quote from: Steve069 on April 23, 2016, 06:12:06 PM
Do you have a response to my question about the L&Z pads being labeled differently on each side? I want to finish these controllers up soon and get the extra features working.
Yes I'm aware of this "problem" and it has already been discussed some pages ago. It doesn't really matter if you solder the L button to the Z pad or vice versa. Of course, if you solder the L button to the L-pad on the top side and the Z button to the Z-pad on the bottom side, then you got both buttons soldered to the very same pad and it won't work. ;)

But as stated in the installation guide you can also use different combinations (Up + Start for example). L + Z is just the button combination recommended by me. And I can understand that the ambiguous solder pad labels on the top and bottom side can be confusing. ^^

Steve069

April 24, 2016, 02:15:48 PM #209 Last Edit: April 24, 2016, 02:25:13 PM by Steve069
Quote from: micro on April 24, 2016, 12:48:16 AM
Quote from: Vectrexpert64 on April 21, 2016, 08:11:01 PM
Just saying, great job on this project.
I am very interested in ordering, so, what's the current availability?
I have three of the GC-styled sticks and they are far too sensitive.
Thanks in advance
I've got still some left, but only a hand full. If you want some, just send me an email (see 1st post).



Quote from: Steve069 on April 23, 2016, 06:12:06 PM
Do you have a response to my question about the L&Z pads being labeled differently on each side? I want to finish these controllers up soon and get the extra features working.
Yes I'm aware of this "problem" and it has already been discussed some pages ago. It doesn't really matter if you solder the L button to the Z pad or vice versa. Of course, if you solder the L button to the L-pad on the top side and the Z button to the Z-pad on the bottom side, then you got both buttons soldered to the very same pad and it won't work. ;)

But as stated in the installation guide you can also use different combinations (Up + Start for example). L + Z is just the button combination recommended by me. And I can understand that the ambiguous solder pad labels on the top and bottom side can be confusing. ^^

OK I did catch it on now earlier in the thread. I did not realize L&Z apparently do not matter and are the same. I figured they were specific just like the thumbstick 1-2-3-4-5-6 needs to be in the correct order it will be screwed up. I figured there would be a 50-50 chance of wiring the pads wrong.

Roboplodicus

Hey, the boards are awesome just assembled one from the 3.0 batch today, I've been messing around with the code on your v2.2 boards, what does changing the minrange and maxrange variables do exactly?  Because I've been trying to increase the range the joystick outputs to 92 steps in each direction, but when I change min and max range to 92 and use a controller test program on my flash cart I get this weird behavior as I move the joystick upwards, I get increasing output until I get almost to the edge then I get -88, I have the same problem moving the stick to the right.  Am I overflowing(I think it's called when you go from the highest integer values to the lowest by adding to it because the number has run out of digits) one of the integer values do you think? 

zaneiken

Damn, missed out again.  Have been wanting to replace my set of v1.0 PCBs.

henriqueweis

does it work on a usb controller?

it works just like the directional. there's no sensitivity. its ON/OFF .
im afraid the hardware is different. it doesnt have this plug, its is direct weldered in the controller. pictures attached


Roboplodicus

May 31, 2016, 07:23:43 PM #213 Last Edit: May 31, 2016, 08:24:15 PM by Roboplodicus
So I made a discovery today, and that is that if you have this yobo controller for the n64(which uses the same shaped hole as the joystick module that comes with these pcbs) and heads up there is another yobo controller for the n64 that has a different joystick cap that will not work for this "mod".



and you are willing to sacrifice it for it's joystick thumbcap(I'm looking right now for where to buy these thumbsticks right now, if anyones knows where please speak up) and then you cut it down the half dome and only the thing dome part, then you cut up the top half of the standard n64 joystick housing that it is just a dome with a octagon missing on top like this



the bottom of the larger top plastic column (not the smaller lower one that the metal rod goes into) will hit the octagon you have cut out, there by giving you something diagonal values somewhat closer to what a standard n64 joystick would give.  I'm currently getting values of about +-70, +-60 in the corners, this could be changed a little with a little xacto-ing though to get even closer to the +-75,+-65 that a new OEM stick corners at. Make sure that you only cut the half dome down to the edge of the larger upper column(you will only be cutting from the sides, not from below)  The only catch is a minor one that you don't have anything to prevent random flim flam from falling into your controller, and the stick cap could potentially come off(if it's tugged on) though that can be fixed by (super)gluing the cap onto the metal rod that goes in it.  Final product, this mod also has the advantage of providing more precision by virtue of a taller joystick and it has a nice grippy top too.


micro

Today I've released the gerber files needed to order the N64 Stick Converter PCB v3 as well as the microcontroller program code. You'll find the link to a archive containing both in the 1st post of this thread. :)

I can also announce that I've made another small batch of the PCB's, if you need one let me know. (See first post.)

Link83

Quote from: micro on June 12, 2016, 02:24:36 AM
Today I've released the gerber files needed to order the N64 Stick Converter PCB v3 as well as the microcontroller program code. You'll find the link to a archive containing both in the 1st post of this thread. :)

I can also announce that I've made another small batch of the PCB's, if you need one let me know. (See first post.)
Brilliant! :D Thanks micro!

Any chance you might also release the v2.2 PCB files for those who want to experiment with full size analog sticks?

Roboplodicus

Quote from: Link83 on June 12, 2016, 02:33:33 AM
Any chance you might also release the v2.2 PCB files for those who want to experiment with full size analog sticks?

@Micro  The 2.2 gerber files would be most greatly appreciated, i've actually been messing around with my last couple 2.2 boards over the past couple weeks.  Also are you planning on releasing the atmel project files for the code after you finish selling this last batch so we can play around with it ourselves?


Link83

Quote from: micro on June 12, 2016, 11:56:54 PM
To answer both questions: Eventually I might do so. :)
Thanks for considering it micro :)

If you dont mind me asking, what program do you use to design your PCB's? I'm only used to Cadsoft Eagle so just wondered if there might be any .brd files instead of gerbers (I know Eagle can still import gerbers, but you apparently loose certain layers/details in the process?)

Roboplodicus

@micro I was able to get conrad to ship the joystick/pots to me in Mexico, but the shipping was 45 euros no matter if my order was 5 euros or 50 sort of lame but I might just make a bulk order of like 15 and give some new joysticks to my friends.  Conrad will ship almost anywhere except USA and Canada I checked, but atleast to ship to Mexico it's very expensive.

also I was curious if anyone knew where to get replacements for the joystick thumb caps, either the grippy ones that come with the new gen of GC style to upgrade my v2 GC style micro upgraded controllers with the old slippery plastic sticks or these playstation style types that come on yobo's n64 controllers that fit the joysticks in the GC style replacements.  The ones in the yobo controller actually do fit but the yobo controller is 15$ a piece that can't be justified just for the joystick.



@link83 What modifications were you planning on making to the boards?

Link83

Quote from: Roboplodicus on June 14, 2016, 12:08:17 PM
@link83 What modifications were you planning on making to the boards?
Well, its just an idea at the moment! but I was planning on only using 'full size' (16mm) analog sticks, so first I was going to remove the smaller analog stick support from the v2.2 PCB designs.

I also want to extend the PCB slightly so I can add a place for the button used on PlayStation/Xbox analog sticks (It would make the PCB a snug fit in the N64 analog stick casing but it should be possible) and then have that button connected up to the extended range pad, so that if you hold down the analog stick button when booting it would increase the diagonal range if required.

Finally I also want to add two holes in the middle of the PCB (beneath the ATiny24 chip) to accomodate the two plastic struts present on the bottom of unmodified GameCube/Wii analog sticks (At least the metal cased Mitsumi versions, not the all-plastic screwed-on versions) I want to use the 'type 2' GameCube analog sticks shown in this thread (Section 2.5):-
http://smashboards.com/threads/technical-knowledge-compilation-gamecubes-controllers-tvs-recording.335040/
Along with some OEM GameCube thumbsticks which I managed to find on ebay.

Basically I want to make a version of the PCB that supports most of the original analog stick mechanisms used by Nintendo/Sony/Microsoft, although obviously to use 'full size' analog sticks it will be necessary to modify the original N64 analog sticks casing to make them fit.

Well, thats the plan anyway! Currently all I have done is import all the gerbers layers from the v3 PCB into Eagle and saved it as a .brd. Unfortunately I lost all the vias/plated holes in the import process, so will have to re-add them and then work from there.

micro

Quote from: Link83 on June 15, 2016, 12:45:30 AM
I also want to extend the PCB slightly so I can add a place for the button used on PlayStation/Xbox analog sticks (It would make the PCB a snug fit in the N64 analog stick casing but it should be possible) and then have that button connected up to the extended range pad, so that if you hold down the analog stick button when booting it would increase the diagonal range if required.

That's a bad idea, because the program requires the stick to be in its untouched, neutral position when the console is turned on.  ;)

Link83

Quote from: micro on June 15, 2016, 03:11:01 AM
Quote from: Link83 on June 15, 2016, 12:45:30 AM
I also want to extend the PCB slightly so I can add a place for the button used on PlayStation/Xbox analog sticks (It would make the PCB a snug fit in the N64 analog stick casing but it should be possible) and then have that button connected up to the extended range pad, so that if you hold down the analog stick button when booting it would increase the diagonal range if required.

That's a bad idea, because the program requires the stick to be in its untouched, neutral position when the console is turned on.  ;)
Doh! I totally forgot it calibrates the neutral position of the analog stick at power on.

Hmm, well i'll probably add the button position anyway - just for compatability with unmodified PlayStation/Xbox/Wii U analog sticks, even if it might be a useless button! ::)

Roboplodicus

@link82 that sounds like an awesome project please give updates this guy is super interested.

Speaking of using xbox sticks have you put one in a 2.2 board?  I put one in the one of my 2.2 boards and I thought it felt like the it needed a software deadzone.  Like any tiny movement make Mario in Mario 64 take off.  IDK if this is just me.  @micro did you ever test out a 360 joystick with the 2.2 board/code and if you did what was your experience?


public-pervert

It's very nice you shared the hex and gerbers!

Is there any chance you could post the schematics aswell? So I could design a different board if needed, instead of reverse engineering yours.

Thanks!

KaBoomPow

Hi everyone, first post!

Joined to say thanks to the OP for releasing gerbers along with all the required info!!  ;)

I'm still waiting for parts to arrive, but if you live in the states you can get a set of 3 x boards manufactured for ~$6 at OSHpark.com! You'll need to generate a cutout layer, but otherwise the files are all that you need to get them made.

Roboplodicus

Hey Micro, I'm putting together some of these pcbs and I was wondering how to use the pogo pins to program the attiny24's. I first solder them and the resistor to the board but the pins you linked to were too small for the 6 holes that I think are used from programming...What is the setup you used to program your boards?

micro

I don't know where I wrote about the pogo pins, but it certainly wasn't in this thread. ^^ The N64 Stick Converter PCB V3 got pretty big holes for the ISP interface. Actually you don't need pogo pins at all. Just insert standard 2.54 mm pin headers into your 6-pin programming cable. Insert the cable and tilt it to establish a good connection, and then start the flashing process:




Quote from: KaBoomPow on July 04, 2016, 01:59:33 PM
Hi everyone, first post!

Joined to say thanks to the OP for releasing gerbers along with all the required info!!  ;)

I'm still waiting for parts to arrive, but if you live in the states you can get a set of 3 x boards manufactured for ~$6 at OSHpark.com! You'll need to generate a cutout layer, but otherwise the files are all that you need to get them made.
You're welcome. :)

But I don't know if Oshpark is the perfect choice for this PCB. Oshpark produces PCB's with a thickness of 1.6mm. The N64 Stick Converter PCB on the other hand should be 1.2 mm thick...
You might end up with being unable to close the stick housing because of the extra thickness.

Roboplodicus

Quote from: micro on July 20, 2016, 08:37:59 AM
I don't know where I wrote about the pogo pins, but it certainly wasn't in this thread. ^^ The N64 Stick Converter PCB V3 got pretty big holes for the ISP interface. Actually you don't need pogo pins at all.

...

Quote from: KaBoomPow on July 04, 2016, 01:59:33 PM
Hi everyone, first post!

Joined to say thanks to the OP for releasing gerbers along with all the required info!!  ;)

I'm still waiting for parts to arrive, but if you live in the states you can get a set of 3 x boards manufactured for ~$6 at OSHpark.com! You'll need to generate a cutout layer, but otherwise the files are all that you need to get them made.

You're welcome. :)

But I don't know if Oshpark is the perfect choice for this PCB. Oshpark produces PCB's with a thickness of 1.6mm. The N64 Stick Converter PCB on the other hand should be 1.2 mm thick...
You might end up with being unable to close the stick housing because of the extra thickness.

Ya it was someone else that linked to the pogo pins that's ok they were only like 2$.  To program the microcontroller I thought you needed a power source independent of the programmer?

Also I got 3 of these boards from oshpark, and the while you still can close the stick housing, the extra thickness causes the joystick to hit the joysticks metal circle physically before it hits the stick housing corners, though because the stick sits higher the actual angle range is slightly greater than with a 1.2 board so the joystick feels a tiny bit less sensitive, so those are the pros and cons for ordering from oshpark.

micro

QuoteTo program the microcontroller I thought you needed a power source independent of the programmer?
That depends on the programmer you're using.


DanStars

Hello, I recently acquired the GC style stick but I'm having issues with its over-sensitivity, as expected.

After partially reading this thread, I'm considering buying some PCBs to mod my controllers.

Problem is, I'm Brazilian. Do you have any plans on shipping to Brazil in the future?

WIscompton

Hey Mirco!

I emailed you a week ago and got a response that you had some in stock.  Emailed you back with my address/information and have not heard back since.  Let me know what I owe and I will have you paid ASAP.  Thank you!

illerG

Quote from: micro on March 13, 2015, 08:57:38 AMtext

I wanted to thank you micro for creating these PCB:s!

Bought a few last year and couldn't hold myself from buying a few more earlier this year.

Due to work and the tons of shit I couldn't build my first controller until about 3 weeks ago.

And all I can say is that I love it  ;D

Thanks again micro you beautiful genius!

Jezry

Got mine and installed it yesterday.
Love it. Thank u Micro.
I got some third party controllers where the joystick looks like a wierd child of the original n64 joysticck and a analog joystick with only four cables going to the gamepad has anybody tried the chip on these?

iacka

Hey everyone first time user with these PCB's was pretty excited to get some!
finished installing my first one and I have come across a little issue. I can't help but notice that the analogue isn't calibrating properly it seems that the deadzones are out quite a bit. I have noticed when playing goldeneye and super mario 64 the deadzones come into play quite a bit. I have an attachment showing Micros PCB compared to an original n64 joystick . I have calibrated my board multiple times but to have no effect on any changes/improvements.
Any ideas on how to fix this issue?

micro

I've attached the microcontroller's source code to the 1st post. :)


@iacka: Hmm, usually the term "dead zone" describes the travel of the stick in the neutral position before a change in position is registered by the controller/console. So do you really mean dead zone in the traditional sense?

I can see that the test result pic you've provided doesn't look too nice. How does it affect Goldeneye and especially Mario 64? Can't Mario run at full speed when pushed up-right?

Have you already checked your soldering? Is the joystick even on the PCB? Are the joystick's solder joints ok?

The way the calibration function works is following: It measures the minimum and maximum voltage that the two joystick's potentiometers are producing while you move the stick to the boundaries. The scaling factors generated by the calibration function guarantee that in the end the range of each axis (x & y) will at least be +/- 81. But because the stick+PCB+restrictor gate isn't 100.0% aligned and the potentiometer is not perfectly linear, chances are that one direction will produce higher values than the opposite side. So there's a cap implemented which limits the range down to 84. That means the end result with your test program won't be a perfect octagon.

But still, if I compare your pic with this one, yours seem to be deviant...

Have you assembled another PCB and does it show the same behaviour?

Seroczynski

Just sent you an order for four PCB. Thank you for the continued support and development on this.

pr0cess0r

Where you buy those gamecube style stick because i see theme at 45$ now... is it a new revision that dont need mod?

iacka

@micro yeah exactly right! Mario cant run full speed when pushed up-right as well as right and down-right
I've checked my soldering and made sure that the PCB is flush with the potentiometer
I have assembled 3 out of 4 and they all have the same result unfortunately, I have also tried turning on extended range mode but still had very poor calibration.
Starting to run out of ideas :(